Schaidt Innovations Nabs 10% More Market with Creo




For a company that launched in 2013, Schaidt Innovations has deeper roots and more engineering cred than businesses decades older. That’s because the Schaidt team, based in southwest Germany, emerged from the same company that famously developed the first car radio in 1949, the first with fully automatic station search in 1953, and the first with solid-state components in 1963.

Producing Becker audio under the umbrella of a larger parent company, the Schaidt team introduced auto-reverse to the cassette player in 1975, brought the first integrated CD players to car audio in 1985, and innovated the first unit with a speech dialog system for navigation in 2004.

Becker Radio 

Since around 2000, Schaidt-based engineers have provided dashboard audio technology to the world’s most prestigious automotive companies, such as Audi, BMW, Daimler, Porsche, Volkswagen, GM, Land Rover, Jaguar, Aston Martin, Alfa Romeo, Fiat, Ferrari, Maserati, Lamborghini, Hyundai, Saab, and Volvo.

Why do we call it a new company then? After a hard-fought battle with its parent company to keep the team together and in Germany, Schaidt spun off two years ago and became a standalone firm. And while these kinds of transitions never come easy, the move uniquely positioned the group to start fresh with the know-how of an industry legend, but the flexibility of a startup.

As a seasoned development company, for example, Schaidt knows that what consumers want in their dashboard audio system changes more quickly than just about anything else in your car. In fact, Schaidt doesn’t even call it a car radio anymore. It’s CarMultimedia—and infotainment and navigation system. Schaidt Innovations work today reaches into telecommunications, information technology, building and security systems, and distributed storage systems.

Schaidt-head 

On the other hand, as a flexible startup, the company is quickly setting itself up with technologies that make development faster and costs lower. How? By using the best PTC solutions.

A long-time user of Pro/ENGINEER, Schaidt recently upgraded to the Creo Essentials package, which provides both Creo Parametric for state-of-the-art 3D modeling and the Creo Flexible Modeling Extension (FMX) for quickly responding to last-minute changes. With this powerful combination, engineers hoped to cut IT costs and support more concept design work. Plus, with Creo, Schaidt could draw on the local work force as business grows (Schaidt today already employs 500+ workers), because companies throughout the region use PTC software.

Of course the pros, Schaidt didn’t need much convincing that design data should be well organized from the start, and so it deployed Windchill as well. While novice companies may start off stashing models on the desktop or shared file folders, Schaidt knows the dangers of an unmanaged system—lost, overwritten, and duplicated work; revisions and file names that don’t make sense; and inefficient collaboration.

Ed- Automotive design can be complex and that’s why the functionality in Windchill 10.0 is resonating with PTC customers:


Schaidt’s results since upgrading to Creo have been impressive. The company says that it now makes design changes more quickly, and can communicate those changes effectively to its manufacturing line. Customer loyalty is growing, and delivery times are faster. In fact, in the short time since upgrading to Creo, the company has nabbed a 10% increase in market share.